Thinking about Teaching Law in a Cdn Law School (Common Law): Read This

(Revised Thurs July 10, 2014)

I am in the midst of a massive data collection and crunching process, in support of an article I am writing on public engagement by law profs in Canadian common law schools (that is, LLB and JD granting schools).  To this end, I have collected demographic and career data from the public web profiles on the people listed on the websites of these law schools as Assistant, Associate or Full professors (and occasionally emeritus). 

The results are fascinating, especially on some of the gender issues.  I am writing up the article now.  But as a teaser, here are provisional data on the education of Canada's common law professors.  Table 1 below shows the top 15 institutions from which Canadian law professors obtained their highest degree (an LLM or increasingly a doctorate -- more on that in the article) and the proportion of profs who received degrees from each institution.  I had data for 572 profs (a number that includes a number of emeritus profs). Table 2 represents the top 15 institutions, at the Assistant professor level.  It reflects, in other words, more recent hiring trends.  (Here, I had data for 102 profs.)

Table 1: Highest Degree By Institution, All Profs


%
Toronto 12.8%
Harvard 11.0%
Osgoode/York 9.4%
Oxford 8.2%
Columbia 6.6%
Yale 5.4%
Cambridge 4.9%
UBC 4.2%
McGill 3.8%
Dal 3.3%
London 3.0%
Queens 1.7%
NYU 1.7%
Michigan 1.4%
Berkeley 1.4%

 

Table 2: Highest Degree by Institution, Assistant Profs


%
Toronto 13.7%
Osgoode/York 13.7%
Harvard 12.7%
McGill 9.8%
Columbia 5.9%
UBC 4.9%
Dal 4.9%
Oxford 3.9%
Yale 3.9%
Ottawa 3.9%
Cambridge 2.9%
Sask 2.0%
Chicago 2.0%
Sydney 2.0%
Montreal 2.0%

 

These top 15 schools account for 79% of all of the highest degrees of all profs, and 88% of all of the highest degrees of Assistant Profs. 

These data suggest that UK schools have lost ground relative to Canadian schools, while US schools continue to figure prominently (although perhaps not as prominently).  In fact, a more general analysis confirms this inference.  Table 3 shows the region in which Canada's common law professors earned their highest degree. 

Table 3: Region Where Canadian Common Law Profs Earned their Highest Degree


All Profs Assistant Profs
Canada 42.0% 55.9%
US 34.3% 31.4%
UK 17.7% 8.8%
Aus/NZ 3.0% 2.0%
Eur 3.0% 2.0%

 

Canadian origin higher degrees have swelled among Assistant professors.  These data are heartening to those of us labouring in Canadian law schools to produce competitive graduate students .  We may be overcoming the "neocolonialism" of academic hiring -- the bias in favour of foreign credentials.

Special credit goes to Toronto, Osgoode and McGill for their success in producing graduate degree holders securing positions in Canadian law faculties.